Tuesday, November 20US and Worldwide HEADLINE NEWS!

Politics

Is dynastic politics on the way out?

Is dynastic politics on the way out?

Politics
Rep. Liz Cheney was elected chair of the House Republican Conference on Tuesday, a leadership position that her father, former Vice President Dick Cheney, held in the 1980s while representing the same Wyoming at-large district that she holds today (despite spending most of her life since middle school living in Virginia). It was a potent reminder that family dynasties can still play a part in American politics. Hard as it is to remember through the fog of the Trump era, about three years ago, dynastic politics seemed like a dominant theme and one of the biggest dangers to the “any kid can grow up to be president” myth of American democracy. In 2015, many foresaw a general election matchup between Hillary Clinton and Jeb Bush, recycling the last names of the candidates from 24 y...
Immigration Politics Is About Perceptions of Control, Not Immigration Policy

Immigration Politics Is About Perceptions of Control, Not Immigration Policy

Politics
Many major political changes over the last few years are related to immigration. From the rise of Eurosceptic political parties in Germany, France, Italy, and elsewhere, to Brexit, and the U.S. election of Donald Trump, many political commentators are blaming these populist and nationalist political surges on unaddressed anti-immigration sentiment among voters. Although anti-immigration opinions certainly have a role to play in those political upsets, voter feelings of chaos and a lack of control over immigration are likely more important. President Trump focused his campaign on the “build the wall” chant that capitalized on the perception of chaos at the southwest border where the worst from Mexico were supposedly crossing. His campaign platform called for cutting legal immigr...
On Politics: Racial Politics Take Center Stage in Mississippi

On Politics: Racial Politics Take Center Stage in Mississippi

Politics
Supported byOn Politics: Racial Politics Take Center Stage in MississippiNov. 20, 2018Good Tuesday morning. Here are some of the stories making news in Washington and politics today._____________________• In Mississippi, a Senate runoff election between Mike Espy, an African-American Democrat, and Cindy Hyde-Smith, a white Republican, has become a test of racial and partisan politics since Ms. Hyde-Smith made a remark about “a public hanging.” The controversy has left her victory, once almost certain, in doubt.• Sixteen House Democrats went public Monday with their opposition to electing Nancy Pelosi as speaker of the House, declaring that “the time has come for new leadership.” Here’s more on their “message of change.”• If she leads...
The future of abortion politics is changing

The future of abortion politics is changing

Politics
In the 2018 midterm elections, voters in three states – Oregon, Alabama, and West Virginia – decided on controversial ballot measures aimed at restricting abortion. Two passed, in Alabama and Virginia, while voters in Oregon rejected a measure to prohibit public funding for abortion.White evangelicals are the largest religious group in Alabama and West Virginia, where restrictions on abortion passed with 59 percent and 51 percent of the vote respectively. Oregon, on the other hand, is a top destination for millennials, where restrictions on abortions were rejected with resounding 64 percent of the vote.ADVERTISEMENTThe starkly different outcomes in these states hint at a larger pattern that’s emerging in abortion politics. Slowly but surely, millennials are beco...
On Politics With Lisa Lerer: These Divided States

On Politics With Lisa Lerer: These Divided States

Politics
Supported byOn Politics With Lisa LererThese Divided StatesImageBy Lisa LererNov. 19, 2018Hi. Welcome to On Politics, your guide to the day in national politics. I’m Lisa Lerer, your host.[Get On Politics delivered to your inbox.]The headlines after Election Day were bleak: “Voters are angry and divided;” “divisions are only growing wider;” and the brutal pronouncement that “America is in a cold civil war.”We are a country increasingly split along partisan lines — where we like to live, what TV we watch, who we want our children to marry, even what we eat.A poll conducted in September by the Simon Wiesenthal Center found that while nearly half of Americans said they were talking about politics more than a couple years ago, a whopping 72 perc...
Politics Podcast: Will Pelosi Be Replaced?

Politics Podcast: Will Pelosi Be Replaced?

Politics
FiveThirtyEight Embed Code <iframe frameborder="0" width="100%" height="180" style="margin:20px auto 25px;max-width:600px;" scrolling="no" src="https://fivethirtyeight.com/player/politics/25325059/"></iframe> The FiveThirtyEight Politics podcast crew discusses whether Rep. Nancy Pelosi will be re-elected as Speaker of the House, now that Democrats have won back the majority, and what the opposition to her says about the party. They also look at new election results out of Florida, Georgia and Arizona and reflect on the significance of the “year of the woman.” You can listen to the episode by clicking the “play” button in the audio player above or by downloading it in iTunes, the ESPN App or your favori...
Stop Falling for Bullshit About ‘Identity Politics’

Stop Falling for Bullshit About ‘Identity Politics’

Politics
Photo: GettyNow that the victorious glow for several high-profile candidates of color has worn off slightly—an inevitability expedited by the final concessions of Andrew Gillum in Florida and Stacey Abrams in Georgia—the time was ripe for a BEWARE OF PLAYING IDENTITY POLITICS, DEMOCRATS piece.That piece comes to us this morning from Politico. It carries the baffling headline, “2020 Democrats go all-in on ‘identity politics.’” It opens (emphasis mine throughout):Democrats thinking about running for president in 2020 are dramatically changing the way the party talks about race in Donald Trump’s America: Get ready to hear a lot more about intersectionality, allyship, inclusivity and POC.White and nonwhite Democratic hopefuls are talking more explicit...
Stop talking to your kids about politics

Stop talking to your kids about politics

Politics
November 19, 2018 Once upon a time, parents were content to read their kids books about talking pigs and rabbits that wear cute blue jackets. If politics was present at all, it was only under cover of riddles and absurdity, in stories like Dr. Seuss' The Lorax — a commentary on capitalism and environmental destruction. But now, subtlety and metaphors are out. The Atlantic reported recently that more and more liberal parents are buying picture books with explicitly politically progressive messages. There's Dreamers, which is full of inspiring messages about immigration, and the best-selling A Is for Activist, aimed at parents eager to raise social justice warriors. While I'm all for molding tolerant kids, I can't wholeheartedly cheer the success of these wok...
This Thanksgiving, here’s how to avoid politics and have a ‘controversy-free’ time with your loved ones

This Thanksgiving, here’s how to avoid politics and have a ‘controversy-free’ time with your loved ones

Politics
This fall has been a record-breaking one for politics. Almost half of Americans of voting age cast ballots in the midterm elections this year – the highest turnout since 1914, before women could vote. We elected the first Muslim and Native American women into Congress and the first openly-gay governor. But let me give you some advice: This Thanksgiving, put politics aside.Politics at the dinner table can be a risky subject, but even more so on Thanksgiving, when six in 10 Americans say they dread the topic coming up. Politics is divisive, and it’s the issue most likely to cause a fight on Thanksgiving. On top of that, as Nobel Prize-winning behavioral economist Daniel Kahneman points out, the chance of you being able to change someone’s mind on a ...

On Politics: Trump Says He Won’t Sit With Mueller

Politics
Supported byOn Politics: Trump Says He Won’t Sit With MuellerNov. 19, 2018Good Monday morning. Here are some of the stories making news in Washington and politics today._____________________• President Trump said in an interview aired on Fox News on Sunday that he most likely would not sit for an interview with the special counsel, Robert Mueller, saying, “We’ve wasted enough time on this witch hunt and the answer is, probably, we’re finished.” Read what else he said.• As evidence piles up pointing to the Saudi crown prince’s responsibility in the killing of Jamal Khashoggi, Mr. Trump has only hardened his refusal to concede that the prince had a hand in the crime. Read why.• As much as some House Democrats say they want to shake up the pa...